Edgar Allan Poe Shortstories Part X

Hi all!

It seems spring is finally coming and I personally can’t wait for the sunshine! πŸ˜€ It’s actually pretty amazing to see how a clear sky or a patch of green grass can change someone’s mood πŸ™‚ And personally, I could really use some brightness about now πŸ˜›

Anyway, speaking about gloomy atmosphere, I’ll be presenting 5 stories again (thankfully not all gloomy πŸ˜› ), and just like before, the titles are links to where you can read them online πŸ™‚

The Oblong Box

This is a quite interesting story about a boat trip turned disastrous. But that’s not all πŸ™‚

The narrator speaks of an artist friend, Cornelius Wyatt on the ship, who claimed to have married a seemingly perfect girl, but as he meets her, she doesn’t seem anything like what he heard of. Besides that, Wyatt has in his room an oblong box, which the narrator believes to contain a painting, but, as it turns out, not all things are as they seem πŸ™‚

Metzengerstein

This story is a really interesting one, and for some reason it was familiar, but I’m almost sure I never read it before.

It’s about two rival families, the Metzengerstein and the Berlifitzing, who owe their rivalry not only to their differences in wealth and stature, but also to a prophecy, claiming one’s victory over the other. The story gets more interesting when the stable of the Berlifitzing family catches on fire and a wild demeaned horse is caught by the servants of the Baron Frederick Von Metzengerstein. Frederick is fascinated by the horse and spends a lot of time with it. After a while, he starts to change in behavior, but this is only noticed by one of his servants. But as the Baron’s own house catches on fire one night, a really strange thing happens, that makes you wonder about the true character of the demonic horse.

The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq.

This story is again a funny one, but in a satirical and critical way. The narrator of the story is Mr. Thingum Bob himself,Β  and he presents his road to success, starting from the moment he wanted to become “great” by being an editor and poet.

This is a satire of article writing and criticism, because in the story, the pieces of literature we might consider valuable (such as Dante’s “Inferno”) is claimed to be nothing more than a “rant”. And of course, ironically, a “poem” (if we can even call it that) by the narrator is a great sensation which marks his first steps in becoming well known.

This is definitely an interesting story, and I think worth reading πŸ™‚

How To Write A Blackwood Article

This story is a pretty funny one, and has as protagonist a very vain Signora Psyche Zenobia. In her endeavors to write a great article, she meets with Mr. Blackwood, who tells her about the substances of brilliant articles. The points he makes are funny, and the whole just seems to be a mockery of writers who present so called sensations.

A Predicament

This story is a sequel to “How To Write A Blackwood Article”, and it is the actual article of Signora Psyche Zenobia.

As Mr. Blackwood suggested in the other story, this lady presents a most terrifying experience of her life. She uses the agreed style and quotes, which make the story hilarious, because she often emphasizes things that are not at all important, and the quotes are awfully misspelled, as she wrote them down before as she understood them.

It’s a really funny story and I would recommend it, because it certainly made me laugh a couple of times πŸ˜€

Well, I guess that’s all for now. Stay tuned for Part XI of the series πŸ™‚

Until then, have a nice day and a nice read πŸ™‚

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